The state of the American collective psyche expressed through films and series with parallel universes

/, Essays, Blesok no. 122/The state of the American collective psyche expressed through films and series with parallel universes

The state of the American collective psyche expressed through films and series with parallel universes

Introduction
Deciphering the symptoms
Science and parallel universes
Creation of parallel universes in American society
No matter how much we get to know ourselves, we still only know ourselves in the same universe
Melanie Klein
Joyce Byers = Melanie Klein
Conclusion
References


This phenomenon is not new, but, this time, it is amplified through social media and news, which create so-called echo chambers in which we listen to what we want to hear and what we are talking about, and get instant gratification. So, the modified structure of the self, impregnated with these components, can maintain its structural integrity in only one universe, where the laws of “quantum physics” support the existence of forces that can sustain the stability of the “molecular structure”.

Disintegration occurs when an individual from rural America faces the issue of homosexuality. The same disintegration occurs when the Silicon Valley intellectual tries to understand the denial of climate change in his less educated fellow citizens who put their survival on this planet in God’s hands. Their selves, sucked in or subjected to the laws of parallel universes, are disintegrating to the smallest possible particle.

This is reflected on a collective level, and, therefore, more often on social media, where it can be read, “In what universe is this normal?” Forced to use the same state, nation, currency, educational system, health and other mutual institutions and environment, the American collective psyche is splitting in parallel universes so that it can survive and maintain its molecular constitution. This then surfaces through the creative work of writers in Hollywood and America in a form of a symptom pictured through parallel universes.

No matter how much we get to know ourselves, we still only know ourselves in the same universe

Lately, there are thinkers who are trying to find a solution to the problem of the division of society, but still nothing has changed. In his speeches, Canadian psychology professor Jordan Peterson talks of something dark and dangerous living in the depths of our psyche.

Similar to Peterson, Japanese writer Haruki Murakami in the book Underground (The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche) (Murakami, 2001, pp. 224 – 226.) uses the example of the occult sect Aum, which, in 1995, committed a terrorist act by releasing a toxic gas, Sarin, into the Tokyo metro. In its early days, the cult was campaigning for various political positions, but its members promoted their ideas in a very bizarre manner, for example, by disguising themselves with elephant masks. Not only did the Japanese ignore them, they also had a sense of shame. Murakami through interviewing former members of the cult comes to the conclusion that the ordinary Japanese people ignored them and were ashamed not due to the clown-like appearance of the cult members, but from the feeling that in each of them (not just the cult members) lies the need to be absurd and behave like clown as the only response to the hard and fast life of the ordinary salary man.

Peterson and Murakami are using the Jungian syntagma for the shadow: “The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.” (Jung, 1952, p. 8.) Peterson and Murakami are trying to point their readers and audiences to the chance that in each of us there is something dark and dangerous, what we most likely hate about others.

AuthorBoris Taskov
2018-11-29T14:42:14+00:00 November 29th, 2018|Categories: Literature, Essays, Blesok no. 122|Comments Off on The state of the American collective psyche expressed through films and series with parallel universes